Don’t Let Startup Upkeep Be Your Downfall: Tips for Continued Success

When nearly seven out of ten startups fizzle out before they hit the ten year mark, it’s no wonder the internet is flush with tips of the trade to help you succeed. However, many starry-eyed entrepreneurs get so caught up in the initial launch and logistics of their potential new empire, they forget to save their marketing energy for the long haul. Although launching a small business is always different, it’s imperative that entrepreneurs approach their efforts by evolving traits of both the “tortoise” and the “hare” in the race to the finish line.

Maintain Momentum

Most businesses want to emerge with a big splash, eager to leverage any and all PR or marketing opportunities they can brainstorm. In the early planning stages, figuring out the most fun, exciting and impactful publicity strategies is exhilarating. However, as quarterly reports pile up and daily troubleshooting takes hold of your worries, bombastic early strategies can quickly slow to a trickle. To avoid this, it’s important to utilize all the tools at your disposal to keep your brand presence strong and relevant without breaking your back to do so.

  • Social media aggregation tools: it’s imperative to maintain a strong media presence for your startup, and there are many tools to help you do so without spending hours a day. Sprout Social or Hoot Suite, for example, can allow you to parcel out a posting strategy that allows you to pre-program posts all at once.
  • “The Fortune is in the Follow Up,” is an old saying that pertains strongly to new businesses. Strategize Your Success points out that a little personal massaging can go a long way. Something as simple as a kind follow-up email can be enough to remind your busy potential clients that you’re around and ready to spring to action.

Read the Fine Print

While some people are natural detail-oriented and wouldn’t dare skip a single line of fine-print, many of us, much to the chagrin of our bank accounts, don’t come over details that could have negative long-term effects on a start up. For example, if leasing a commercial space, Lisa Girard for Entrepreneur notes that many commercial spaces are wracked with hidden fees, utilities and the potential for costly misfortune. For example, many buildings built prior to the 1990s still contain asbestos, or lead if built before 1970. If your business offers a unique product or proprietary service, it’s also essential to ensure all the patents are in order. Although it’s tempting to assume there isn’t anyone lurking to ride the coattails of your wonderful idea, Sansone and LauberMissouri Lawyers,  points out that there are many people and companies that are just waiting to “unscrupulously violate patent owner’s right.”

Create a Lasting Culture

Employee “quit” numbers are up, according to Forbes, and the cost of losing an employee is not only astronomical, but the disengaged employees that leave or often disengaged leading up to the decision, which also hurts bottom line and productivity. In a nutshell, employees who feel valued and engaged can help give your company wheels that helps give it those extra miles for the long haul. Bill Conerly for Forbes notes that in order to maximize retention and culture, business owners should:

  • Track retention: look for trends and arcs in employee happiness, engagement and productivity
  • Give employees a path: no one wants to sit around feeling like a cog in a cubicle all day. Giving employees a long term purpose and goals can help them feel like the work they do is leading up to something rewarding.
  • Increase Flexibility: Draconian rules and rigidity can make employees feel trapped and undervalued. Although there needs to be a balanced schedule and professional environment, flexible hours and accommodation of personal schedules can go a long way to keep employees happy.
  • Keep an Eye out for Stressors: whether it’s a jack-hammer outside or a thermostat stuck on 90 degrees . . .or even a particularly loud talker . . . office stressors can quickly turn a tranquil environment into a high-stress zone.

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